June 24, 2024

Saran Rubenzer

Contemporary Style

Why I Bought An Ev And Embrace Living Without A Car

5 min read

Introduction

I’ve been driving a car since I was 16 years old. It’s been a part of my identity, both as an adult and especially in my younger years. In fact, it’s probably what first comes to mind when you think about me. So when I decided last year that it was time to buy a new vehicle, the first thing I did was do some research into electric cars. Now that we live in an era where the technology is finally viable for mass production (and not just for people who can afford luxury vehicles or prototypes), there are plenty of options available—and lots of reasons why these machines have caught on with so many consumers:

Car ownership is expensive.

  • Maintenance, insurance, fuel and parking expenses
  • Depreciation of your vehicle
  • The cost of a car vs. the cost of riding public transportation

I don’t like the idea of being locked into an auto loan for years at a time.

I don’t like the idea of being locked into an auto loan for years at a time.

The interest rates on car loans are high, and if you can’t pay off your loan in full, it will be reflected on your credit score as a negative mark. This means that when you go to buy a new car or get another loan in the future, this blemish on your record could make it more difficult to do so (and may cost more).

If something happens with one of my cars and I need to sell it quickly or replace it with another vehicle temporarily–or even permanently–I don’t want there to be any obstacles standing between me and getting rid of my current ride as soon as possible. And finally: If I can get everything else right about owning an EV (which I think I’m doing), why should having some extra cash lying around be so important?

I drive really slowly and cautiously, so I don’t feel nervous driving in my area.

If you’ve ever been behind me, you know that I drive very slowly and cautiously. I follow the speed limit, even when it’s not enforced. I don’t like to take risks or be late for anything, so if there’s any chance of traffic ahead of me and no shoulder on the road, then I will slow down until there is room to pull over safely if needed.

I also try not to waste gas by going over 55 mph (the speed limit here). This means that sometimes when other cars are passing me on a two-lane highway with no divider between us and them, they’ll honk at me because they think I’m going too slow! But if they knew how much money we save each month by not having car payments or insurance premiums…

Electric cars are much more efficient than gas-powered ones.

Electric cars are much more efficient than gas-powered ones. They have fewer moving parts, which makes them lighter and more aerodynamic. And because electric motors don’t waste energy in the form of heat, they can be made smaller and lighter as well–which reduces drag on your vehicle’s engine or battery pack (depending on how you power your car).

My commute involves walking or biking to the train station and catching a ride on commuter rails or buses when necessary.

You can use an EV for your daily commute.

I take public transportation, so I don’t have to worry about parking or gas prices.

You can walk or bike to the train station and catch a ride on commuter rails or buses when necessary.

I wanted to help fight climate change.

Climate change is really a problem that affects everyone. It’s not just an environmental issue, it’s a human rights issue and an economic one as well. I believe that we all have a responsibility to do what we can to fight climate change–especially those of us in the developed world who have contributed most to its causes.

The link between rising fossil fuel prices and climate change is pretty clear: as demand for these fuels increases because of their importance in our economy, so does their price tag–and this increase contributes both directly (through higher costs) as well as indirectly (because people may choose cheaper alternatives that are less environmentally friendly). This effect on our wallets will only get worse if we don’t take action soon!

Climate change also has serious consequences for our health: hotter temperatures can lead to heatstroke or exhaustion; extreme weather events like hurricanes can cause injuries from debris flying through the air; drought leads mosquitoes carrying Zika virus into new areas where they haven’t been seen before…the list goes on! And these aren’t just theoretical risks–we’ve already seen some devastating effects here at home with Hurricane Matthew last year alone causing over $22 billion worth damages along coastal areas like Charleston SC where my family lives while displacing thousands across several states including North Carolina NC where my brother lives today having moved there after graduating college at UNC Chapel Hill NCUHSC Chapel Hill NCUHCCHCCHC

Owning an electric vehicle is worth it to me because it aligns with my values and lifestyle choices in a way that makes sense for me as an individual.

Owning an electric vehicle is worth it to me because it aligns with my values and lifestyle choices in a way that makes sense for me as an individual.

It’s a good fit for me because it aligns with my values and lifestyle choices in a way that makes sense for me as an individual.

Conclusion

I’m not saying that everyone should buy an electric car. The decision to do so is a personal one, and it’s important to think about what matters most to you before making any big purchases like this one. But if you’re on the fence about buying an EV or living without a car altogether, I hope this post has given you some food for thought!

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